Arkansas PBS > Engage > Blog > Keagan and Chanin’s Stories - “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies”

Keagan and Chanin’s Stories - “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies”

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When cancer is diagnosed, it doesn’t affect just one person. It impacts entire families. Keagan Provost — a feisty, five year old from Conway — has had five brain tumors, four craniotomies, 12 emergency brain surgeries, 145 radiation treatments and hundreds of CTs and MRIs. He’s also had support from his family, including his aunt Chanin Slilz, and from friends and fans.  

As part of the “Cancer: Emperor of All Maladies” Share Your Story campaign, Keagan (with his mom, Robin) and his aunt Chanin shared their stories about Keagan’s fight against cancer with AETN. 

  

When Keagan visited us in AETN studios, he stole our hearts, as we imagine he has touched yours. Along with his aunt Chanin, we consider Keagan one of our heroes. The smile on his face is especially powerful considering how difficult his journey has been. His story is one of many testaments about the long and arduous battle — across the globe and throughout history — that mankind has waged against cancer. You can share your cancer story or watch the stories of others like Keagan as reminder that you’re not alone at youtube.com/user/kenburnspbs. 

Starting Monday, March 30, at 8 p.m., AETN will air “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies,” a film by Barak Goodman based on the 2010 Pulitzer Prize-winning book “The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer” by Siddhartha Mukherjee.

The three-part series, presented by Ken Burns, is the most comprehensive documentary on a single disease ever made and shares a “biography” of cancer — covering it from its first documented appearance thousands of years ago through epic battles in the 20th century to conquer it, to a radical new understanding of its essence. “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies” also explores the current status of cancer knowledge and treatment — and what may well be the dawn of an era where cancer may become a chronic or curable illness instead of its historic status as a form of a death sentence.


SHARE YOUR STORY:

youtube.com/user/kenburnspbs

 

LEARN MORE:

“Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies”

Keagan Provost - Keagan’s Krew


TUNE IN:

Monday, March 30, through Wednesday April 1, 2015

“Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies,” at 8 each night