Arkansas PBS > Educators > Educator's Blog > Schoolhouse Daily Newsletter Weekly Roundup – May 15, 2020

Schoolhouse Daily Newsletter Weekly Roundup – May 15, 2020

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Our Schoolhouse Daily Newsletter was chock-full of videos, games, and advice to help students keep learning and staying active while school Is out.  We observed a phenomenon that only happens in Hawaii as we watched PBS Digital Studios’ “Physics Girl.” As we played the game “freeze,” we practiced the important skill of self-control. Plus, we explored new science activities like growing sprouts from beans to creating a flashlight constellation. Have a look at the list, there is plenty to see and do!

The Amazing Effects of Gratitude

Being grateful can positively affect your mind, body and relationships. Learn more in this video from PBS Digital Studios' "BrainCraft."

This Phenomenon Only Happens in Hawaii

In parts of the world, there are certain parts of the year and certain times of day when you can experience the subsolar point or Lahaina noon. There appears to be no shadow because the sun is directly overhead. Learn more in this video from PBS Digital Studios' "Physics Girl."

I Am a Native Olympian

Every year, hundreds of Alaska Native teens from all over the state gather for the Native Youth Olympics (NYO). They compete in games that have been passed down for generations. In 2012, Autumn Ridley broke the world record for the Alaskan High Kick, one of NYO's most popular events. Learn more in this video from PBS Digital Studios' "Indie Alaska."

Money, A Global Game of Trust

The value of money all comes down to TRUST. When did we transition from the barter system to using money? Learn more in this video from PBS Digital Studios' "Two Cents."

Why Don’t Other Animals Wear Glasses

Vision impairment is common in humans, so why not the rest of the animal kingdom? Learn more in this video from PBS Digital Studios' "It's Okay to Be Smart."

SCIENCE ACTIVITIES

Grow Sprouts from Dried Beans

With this activity, children can see day by day that living things grow – but it takes time, and we have to wait! Usually things grow so slowly we can’t see it, but with this activity we can see how something grows each day. As Mister Rogers sang “You’re bigger than you were a day ago.”

Create Flashlight Constellations

Whether viewing them in the night sky, at a planetarium or as projections onto your bedroom ceiling, looking up at the stars can be relaxing. In this activity, your child will observe stars and see how these points of light can be grouped together to form pictures.

SOCIAL SKILLS/ARTS

Learning Memorization Strategies Through Dance

Give your mind and body a workout by choreographing a multi-step dance with your child.

Practice Self-Control By Playing Freeze Dance

Self-control is an important skill for children to develop so they can do things like not hit when they feel angry or learn to stop playing when they have to go to the bathroom. Here’s a jazzy way to help your child practice self-control by combining music with this "freeze" game.

ADVICE FOR PARENTS

8 Ways to Add Math Into Your Daily Routine

Most young children are naturally interested in math as it exists in the world around them already. Parents can harness that excitement for math into their everyday routines.

Growing Early Friendships

Social skills take a long time to develop, from toddlerhood through the teen years. Here are some tips for navigating first friendships from birth to age three. Learn more in this article from PBS KIDS for Parents.

10 Books for Little Astronauts

Almost every child has questions about space. Here are 10 books to help answer their questions, and maybe even inspire new ones! Learn more in this article from PBS Kids for Parents.

Picture Books About Writers and Writing

Celebrate the art of writing in all its various forms with these 10 books that will tickle your children’s funny bones and teach them some history, too. Learn more in this article from PBS Kids for Parents.

How Thinking About Thinking Can Help Children Build Resilience

In order to thrive, kids need to be able to make the transition from the negative “I can’t” to the proactive “How can I?” Learn more in this article from PBS Kids for Parents.

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